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Geometric art is a phase of Greek art, characterised largely by geometric motifs in vase painting, that flourished towards the end of the Greek Dark Ages, circa 900 BC to 700 BC. Its centre was in Athens, and it was diffused amongst the trading cities of the Aegean. From around 900 BCE the full Geometric style appeared and favoured the rectangular space on the main body of the vase between the handles. Bold linear designs (perhaps influenced by contemporary basketwork and weaving styles) appeared in this space with vertical line decoration on either side. It was in this period that the Maeander design first appeared (perhaps inspired by the practice of wrapping leaves around the rims of metal bowls), destined to become forever associated with Greece and still going strong on everything from plates to beach towels even today. The lower portion of Geometric vessels were often painted in black and separated from the rest of the vase using horizontal lines. An interesting Geometric style shape appeared which was the circular box with a flat lid, on top of which, one to four horses acted as a handle. From the 8th century BCE, Geometric pottery decoration began to include stylized human figures, birds, and animals with nearly all the surface of the vase covered in bold lines and shapes painted in brown and black. Towards the end of the period in the 7th century BCE, the so-called Orientalising style became popular in Corinth. With its eastern trade connections, the city appropriated the stylised plants (e.g. lotus, palm, and the tree of life), animal friezes (e.g. lions), and curved lines of Egyptian and Assyrian pottery to produce its own unique Greek version. The rest of eastern Greece followed suit, often preferring red on a white slip background. Athens also followed the new trend and it became widespread with, for example, the Cyclades also producing pottery in this new freer style, often on very large vases and with more spacious decoration. At the end of the 7th century BCE, Proto-Corinthian pottery reached new heights of technique and quality producing the finest pottery yet seen, in firing, shape, and decoration. The black stylized figures became more and more precisely engraved and were given ever more detail, grace, and vigour. The celebrated black-figure pottery style was born.

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Oinochoe

Geometric Oinochoe from 700 B.C

Height: 0.12 m

Location of the original: Acropolis Museum

€60.00
Pyxis

Geometric Pyxis from 750 B.C

Height : 0.12 m

Location of the original : Archaeological Museum of Athens

€60.00
Pyxis

Geometric Pyxis from 750 B.C

Height : 0.12 m

Location of the original: Archaeological Museum of Athens

€70.00
Skyfos

Geometric Skyfos from 750 B.C

Height : 0.14

Location of the original: Archaeological Museum of Athens

€80.00
Oinochoe

Geometric Oinochoe from 700 B.C

(The Greek word for wine is “oinos” and an oinochoe was a wine pouring jar.)

Height : 0.19 m

Location of the original : Archaeological Museum of Athens

€80.00
Lekythos

Geometric Lekythos from 700 B.C

Height : 0.25 m

Location of the original : Acropolis Museum

€95.00
Amphora

Geometric Amphora from 700 B.C

Height: 0.21 m

Location of the original: Archaeological Museum of Athens

€120.00
Amphora

Geometric Amphora from 750 B.C

Height : 0.22 m

Location of the original : Archaeological Museum of Athens

€120.00
Kylix

Geometric Kylix from 750 B.C

Height: 0.10 m

Location of the original: Acropolis Museum

€170.00